7
autumn 2013
Colour, Light and Movement
Dramatic Licence
The Prep-Year 2 Production at the end of last year was called
Kaleidoscope.
In time-
honoured tradition, there once existed a land where colour fairies lived in harmony
with dwarves who mined colour diamonds to keep their world beautiful.This peace
was shattered one day when the Black andWhite sisters, together with their army of
Year 1s, strode into town and stole the precious colour diamonds, plunging the fairies’
world into monotone colours of black and white. Mr Brad Nelsen, Assistant Principal
and Head of Junior School, played Mr Collingwood, whose mind soon became changed
once he saw the beauty which colours could bring.The diamonds were returned and
all the fairies (including a wonderful group of Preps) rejoiced.
Drama productions at Ruyton bring much joy and excitement to the girls, and are
enjoyed by all members of the community. However, there is also real learning which
takes place during the rehearsals and performances. Girls learn to follow instructions
for stage directions and dances; they learn how to role play; they understand the
importance of working as a team, as well as appreciating the lead roles of some girls;
and they develop self-confidence.
Simple games can be incorporated creatively into classroom activities to promote
learning as well. For instance, in the Alphabet Game a teacher indicates a student and
calls out a letter of the alphabet.The student must reel off a name, an object for sale
and a place all beginning with that letter. In Picture Postcard a visual tableau is created
using students as objects in the scene. In The Beach, a girl may become a seagull, a
shark or a towel.To extend the activity girls are encouraged to create a sound to match
their object, even if it is inanimate. For instance, a grain of sand might say
crunch’.
Whether it is in the classroom, in the drama studio or in the playground, our girls
experience plenty of opportunities to be creative and to shine.
Ms Georgie Parker,
Junior School Drama
Mini-Archies
As a shared direction in Art, the curriculum focus for Term 2 2012 for the Pre Preps to
Years 9/10 was devoted to portraits in many different forms, exploring a wide range of
media. Collage, paint, clay, photography, pencils, stone and fine-liners were employed
to express portraiture in many forms.We coined the name for the project ‘Mini-Archies’
due to the age of the artists and the size of the works generated. Junior School
students studied the work of Picasso and the Expressionists;Year 6 used the work of
Arcimboldo to inspire their fruity faces; and Year 7 was lucky enough to visit the
Archibald Finalists’work at TarraWarra, and go to the studio of finalist, Ms Raelene
Sharp to inspire their group projects. Mr Howard Arkley was introduced to the Year 8
students to inspire their pieces, using photographic self-portraits which were
simplified into tonal areas for painting. Every student’s work was displayed throughout
the School providing an art trail. Archibald finalist Mr Juan Ford generously opened the
exhibition and gave some insight into the process of the competition and his own
work. Many students, parents and staff commented on the talent, colour, variety and
range of media exhibited in Term 3, and enjoyed the different interpretations of
portraiture.The Pre Prep children’s portraits were especially cute and honest!
Mrs Penne Ebbage,
Art teacher